Nahila Campos


Miami Vice
Blue Man
Clock of Time

 
Nahila Campos was born in 1957, Caracas, Venezuela, where she grew up and earned her Bachelor’s Degree in Architecture at the Central University of Venezuela. During her career she worked as an Architecture Assistant for the Linares Architectural Firm at the Bocono Hospital in the Trujillo State of Venezuela; as an Architecture Assistant for the Hugo Zapata Architectural Firm at the Caiza Park in the Guarenas Area; as Chief Designer of VIASA Venezuelan Airlines for more than 4 years where she was in charge of designing offices and hangars; as a Constructor Model and Inspector for Controlca Engineer Firm in the Zulia State, in charge of the Santa Rita Race Track; and as a scale model for other firms in Venezuela.
Her passion for art took her beyond this field to integrate art and architecture. She participated in a Post-Graduated Master Course at the Architecture and Urbanism Department in the Central University of Venezuela where she developed a thesis titled “The Integration of Art into Architecture”. She continued her education in the Visual Arts at the Candido Millan School in Caracas and at the Federico Brandt Institute of Caracas.  Since 2001 she has been part of the Studio 1156 Artist Workshop under the direction of Jaime Ferrer.
In Caracas, Nahila Campos starts working on figurative paintings based on works by Pre-Renaissance artists such as Giotto and Simone Martini, and Renaissance artist Filippo Lippi. She borrowed these artists’ human characters to recreate them through irony and burlesque styles, using a archaic and flat perspective, and tropical colors, to enhance the parody sense of the tableaux; connecting them to the political and critical events in her country Venezuela.
 
In 2001 due to the political changes in Venezuela, Campos moved to Miami. She began a very expressive cycle of paintings led by an axial image, the horse, as an important icon linked to struggle, challenge and destiny; all of this connected to her new phase of life. Her creation was an exploration of her crucial passage to a new territory, the United States, her country of adoption. In 2004 Campos creates another fictional character, the marionette, which relates to theatre and opera as the artist has always kept a strong connection to music. The marionette also involves a metaphorical sense in which it is linked to the struggles in life.
In 2007 until present Campos goes to a more abstract proposal, in which she combines geometric patterns along with miniature urban drawings, and the marionette fused into monochromatic colors and minimal compositions. Multiple figurative elements shown in the small scale and elaborate drawings gives birth to a delirious combination of architectures. There are waiving streets and sinuous paths intertwining with park benches and street lampposts; interior sights intersect with outside nature. Campos recreates here her passion for integrating art and architecture.
In 2008 Campos started to work on installations. She created Story of My Mother, three small-scale model boxes with memorabilia in miniature of her mother’s life. She is currently preparing two more projects on installation and video. 
Since 2000 Nahila Campos has participated in various group shows such as More Than Horses at CitiBank in Key Biscayne; My Lives at Wirtz Gallery in Sunset Drive, Miami; and Journey to Color at Luzma Gallery in South Miami. In 2008 she participated in Trends: Aspects of Contemporary at the Merrill Lynch Arteamericas.